Client Groups – Parents and Children

Parents and Children: Did You know?

Airbags, second-hand car seats or seats bought in the United States, a child left alone in a vehicle: you might be surprised by what you learn.

Airbags and children: some safety precautions

Do not install a child safety seat on the front passenger seat of your vehicle.

If you must absolutely seat a child aged 12 or younger in the front seat, you must first apply for a deactivation of the airbags (PDF, 695 KB).

Once the airbag is deactivated, you must push the passenger seat back so that your child is as far as possible from the dashboard. In the event of an accident, this precaution will afford essential protection.

To have an airbag deactivated

You must fill out the Declaration of Requirement for Air Bag Deactivation (PDF, 104 KB).

If the vehicle is equipped with side airbags or curtains, the child must not be seated in their deployment zone. This would be the case, for example, if the child leans against the vehicle door to sleep.

Never leave a child alone in a car!

Whatever the reason, never leave a child unattended in a road vehicle.

Section 380 of the Highway Safety Code specifies that “No person may leave a child under 7 years of age unattended in a road vehicle under his custody.”

Is baby's winter coat too warm?

Do not loosen the straps that secure your child. Instead, take the coat off or unfasten it.

It is important that the straps remain tight for optimal effectiveness.

Second-hand car seats: strongly discouraged

Getting a second-hand car seat is strongly discouraged, unless you are familiar with its history.

For more information, see our section on second-hand car seats.

Car seats purchased in the United States: it's illegal

If you have purchased a car seat in the United States, you should know that its use is strictly forbidden in Québec, because it does not meet standards. It's too bad, but it's the law.

School buses are safe, even without seat belts

Tests have demonstrated that seat belts installed in school buses could make children less safe. For more information, visit Transport Canada's Web site.

Carrying groups of passengers under 5 years of age

It is recommended that you use a heavier vehicle – such as a minivan – instead of a subcompact, so that passengers are better protected in the event of an accident.

Warning

Seat belts: make sure it adds up!

It is forbidden to carry more passengers than the number of seat belts available in a vehicle. Drivers are also responsible for ensuring that all passengers younger than 16 are wearing their seat belts properly.